Pets & Animal Exotic Pets

Monkey Cages - Be Sure to Get the Right One

I really want you to read this.
Especially if you are thinking of getting a monkey as a pet.
He's very different from a cat or dog as he's an exotic animal - but be aware that monkeys are not easy pets to own.
He's a wild animal and will remain so and will require a lot of commitment from you, his parent for as long as he lives - longer than a cat or a dog.
There are several breeds of small monkeys which do well in monkey cages of the appropriate type - you will have seen them online when you were doing your "monkey as pets" research.
Outdoor monkey cages need to be in the shade and should be larger than you think you'll need - monkeys require lots of space.
Breeds.
Squirrel monkeys are adorable' they're originally from South and Central America and were originally brought to the United States as pets by humans.
Give some thought to whether you'll get a baby monkey or adopt a grown one who will already be acclimated.
A baby will require infant milk until you wean him to solid foods, while a mature one would probably be easier to feed.
Your pet food store will have commercial monkey food but you will need to supplement that with fruits and vegetables - in the wild, he would eat grubs and grasshoppers too.
Cooled hard-cooked eggs, nuts, and seeds; consider stringing dried fruits and vegetables and hang them inside your monkey cages as he'll enjoy tearing them apart.
He's extremely active and sociable and needs plenty of stimulation as he's confined to whatever you provide in the way of monkey cages.
Toys should be wood, not plastic as he's a chewer with very sharp little teeth.
You might want to check out children's toys for the backyard, such as a slide or a little house for one of his monkey cages - these are built of solid, molded plastic and are hard to destroy.
He'll need a tree or two to sleep and play in, swinging from one to the other as he would do in his natural habitat.
A few pieces of garden hose attached to the roof would be perfect for swinging and climbing.
And a hammock - and a place to hide when he feels the need for solitude.
His water bottle should be attached securely to the walls of his monkey cages and his food bowl should be of stainless steel - monkeys are messy and love to throw things, even food.
When you find a veterinarian who's familiar with monkeys, ask him or her about monkey cages.
You'll need a vet for annual examinations and shots.
If your monkey is a youngster, consider spaying or neutering because when he becomes sexually mature, he'll be a lot less affectionate and more aggressive.
Monkeys bite when scared and they do not like loud noises! They do not tolerate small children well, so check to make sure that your state allows monkeys as pets because many of them have laws against it.
If your monkey bites someone, you may run into trouble with your local authority.
Consider the pros and cons carefully - it's a commitment for life and you'll need lots of patience and tolerance - it's a bit like having an eternal three-year old around.
Demanding, noisy, spoiled and absolutely adorable little animals, having a monkey as a pet is not to be taken lightly.
But do enjoy him if you decide to get one.

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