Law & Legal & Attorney Immigration Law

A Few Hints to Remember a Fiance(e) Visa

USCIS requires that the American citizen and their foreign citizen fiancee must have met IN PERSON within the past two years.
USCIS rarely will only bend this rule if it is an EXTREME HARDSHIP for the couple to have met in person, such as if it is against the couple's culture or religion to meet in person before getting wed.
It is always advantageous to meet each other face to face before applying for Form I-129F to establish that you have a real love relationship with your fiancee.
My recommendation to you is to aspire to get everything for the wedding planned before your fiance(e) gets to the United States, in particular if you want something more extravagant.
There will not be a lot of time to plan once your fiance(e) gets here.
When we got married we decided to have something very basic for our wedding ceremony.
We certainly did not have too much time to make plans since we did not really know when our visa would be accepted or when Josue would obtain his interview and confirmation from the embassy.
No matter what type of wedding you have, make sure to mail some kind of wedding invitations or announcements, and save some for your record.
Additionally, take plenty of pictures at the marriage ceremony and be sure to bring them in to your interview when you go for your fiance's change of status.
Save any wedding cards that other people may have mailed to you also.
The more evidence that you can gather that your wedding was bona fide, the better.
When Josue passed through the U.
S.
Immigration and U.
S.
Customs and Border Protection, he got a document called form I-94 after he was cleared and approved by the immigration officers.
This is a card that foreign citizens must fill out when they are entering the United States on a non-immigrant status.
We were absolutely not informed about this form before Josue got here and we had no idea that such a small piece of paper could have so much value.
This card is generally stamped as a final approval for the foreigner to proceed into the US.
It is consistently surrendered at the time of departure from the country.
Seeing that Josue was intending, by all means, to not depart from the US, we believed that this form would not be that vital.
We did not realize that Form I-94 would be altogether obligatory for every next step we took.
This was needed for every single thing that we needed to do to start his new life in the US.
Whether it was for forms to fill out for USCIS, appointments that we had to go into USCIS to bring form I-94 to an immigration officer, to apply for a driver permit, driver's license, or identification at the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), or for getting a social security card at the Social Security Office, everyone required the document.
Protect this document with your life, don't misplace it! We wish we knew more about its importance before we started this journey, but understanding this will give you a bit of a head start!

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